Israel eases Gaza closure, but restrictions remain

Dear Editor,

We have seen some very good work by Associated Press Writer KARIN LAUB, and so we dare to suggested that “Israel eases Gaza closure, but restrictions remain” is not written by her or at least not finalized by her. There sits all kinds of junk in this report that we see in AP reports nonstop, next to (no doubt) Mrs. Laub’s paragraphs properly describing the history of the Gaza-blockade and of the border crossings, transfer of patients out of Gaza, why an export ban, etc. Detailed, interesting, skilled reporting.

AP mantras and distortions dumped into her text:

Israels blockade

– an outcry following a deadly Israeli raid on a blockade-busting flotilla

restrict the import of desperately needed construction materials

– Gaza has been occupied by Israelis since the 1967 Mideast war (rather, Egypt dumped it in Israel’s lap and Israel vacated Gush Katief to no avail; giving Gaza independence led the population to vote for Hamas)

world leaders have asked for a complete lifting of the border closure (see http://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2010/06/g8_leaders_send_love_note_to_b.html )

housing projects in Gaza has largely been on hold since 2006 (true: Hamas does not build for the population, only for war)

Let’s look carefully at this last, sore point – the housing shortage.

Reportedly in Gaza 86,000 housing units are needed for a population of 1.5 million. That is 5.73 houses per 100 inhabitants. (Half of the Gazans is under 15 years old, so it will need fewer but bigger houses than most populations of that size.)

The California Building Industry Association estimated the state’s housing deficit about 1 million homes and apartments in 2003 for a population of 34 million. That is 2.94 houses per 100 inhabitants.

That means that the housing shortage in Gaza is what it was in California in 2003. Doesn’t sound so desperate to us. Especially not after an urban war (courtesy Hamas).

Shalom,

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